Tuesday, October 26, 2021

SOUNDWARE: Temple Sitar. Sitar Soundfont (.sf2) and Zampler Patches.

 


Temple Sitar Soundfont and Zampler Patches. 


Add some of the 'mystical East' to your songs.


Great thing about the Sitar is that it crosses all musical genre borders. From 'classical' Indian and pop, and Bollywood through to Western Rock, indie, and pop, you'll find sitars adding some Eastern mystical spice. 

The other great thing about the Sitar is it's so great for all kinds of effects processing. You can do almost anything to it and it sounds great. Bit like electric guitar. Reverb, delay, phasing, chorus, and flanging. You can even throw some tube distortion an overdrive at one and it still sounds great! 

I'll have a Youtube/demo track available shortly. 

Temple Sitar Download Link. 

So here's the download link. Just download the entire folder to your hard drive then use Zampler's 'load patch' function to navigate to the folder. Then load and audition your required patch. 




A .sf2 Sounfont file is also included within the package. This can be used with Reason's NN-XT or Bitwig's Sampler instruments. You will also find this within the folder, although the following link will give you just the .sf2 soundfont file if you don't want the Zampler patches, 




Patches for Bitwig and Reason NN-XT are in development, I'll post these as soon as they are complete. 
My Facebook Page will update you when they are ready, so perhaps consider following me there.


Disclaimer:

The information contained within this blog post is offered on an informal basis and is correct to the best of my knowledge. I accept no responsibility for outcomes arising from the mis/interpretation or use of this information and/or associated download files. Always download files via security/scanning software. 




 

Saturday, October 23, 2021

BUSINESS FEATURE: Sounds Sell Synths. How Soundware Can Increase Sales, Traffic, and Profits.

 

More value, more stories, a worldwide sales channel, more sales, and HIGHER PROFITS. 

The ONLY way to add greater value to your hardware and software synthesizer and instrument sales is through SOUNDWARE.

If you're in the business of selling music technology products such as synthesizers, keyboards, audio interfaces, microphones, mixers and software products, then you can sell a lot more of them by adding value to your proposition via SOUNDWARE. 

Set your products and proposition apart via 'free' additional soundware bundles and packs. Sample libraries, synthesizer patch collections, loops and beats. All with great sounding, fun, powerful demo videos and tracks.   

All recording musicians want more sounds. Because more sounds means greater creativity, more creative options, which means better songs, and better demos. 

Some North American retailers have already discovered the power of soundware to enhance their sales, their social media feeds, and their profits. Who will be the first European suppliers to follow suit?

Download my pdf guide and find out how I can empower your music technology sales team to greater heights than previously imagined.

Click here for more information, then contact me via telephone on 07802 640373 or via email: simonthompsonmusic@outlook.com if you'd like to find out more. 



Tuesday, October 12, 2021

SOUNDWARE: Cherry Audio Mercury 4. M-Mix-One. Free Patch Collection.

 




Free Mercury 4 Synth Patches.


So whilst playing around with Cherry Audio's Mercury-4 synthesizer for my review I came up with a few patches. I've posted them here so users can download them. Kind of a mixed bag of 32 sounds which include arpeggiator, lead, polysynth, and synth bass patches.

I've called the collection M-Mix-One

Mercury-4 is a Roland Jupiter 4 software emulation and you can download full or demo versions of it from the Cherry Audio website page below. 



Mercury 4 M-Mix-One Patches. Download Link.

You can download the patches using the link below. Just download the entire folder to your hard drive then use Mercury-4's patch navigator to find the files and load them. 




Optional Donation. 

If you like my work, use the products, would like to support future projects, or buy me a drink,  then please donate via my Paypal.me page via the image/link below. Suggested donation for this soundware pack: £1-2. Many Thanks. 






Disclaimer:

The information contained within this blog post is offered on an informal basis and is correct to the best of my knowledge. I accept no responsibility for outcomes arising from the mis/interpretation or use of this information and/or associated download files. Always download files via security/scanning software. All errors and omissions are excepted. 

Monday, October 11, 2021

SOUNDWARE: Full Bucket Music FB7999. Patches One.

 





A set of 32 patches is now available for the Full Bucket Music FB7999.

A mixed bag of heavy synth bass, some edgy proggy synth leads, and some suitably eighties polysynth pads and bells. 

Mainly taken from my first kind of sessions with FB7999 for my review, which you can check out via the link below. 




The FB7999 is a wonderfully accessible and instantly gratifying recreation of Korg's DW Series synths from the mid-eighties.You can download your free/donateware copy from the Full Bucket Music website via the link below. 




FB7999 Patches. Download Link. 


You can download your set of 32 patches from the link below. Just download the entire folder then use FB7999's 'Menu' and 'Load Program' function to load your chosen patch. Hope you enjoy them!




Optional Donation. 

If you like my work, use the products, would like to support future projects, or buy me a drink,  then please donate via my Paypal.me page via the image/link below. Suggested donation for this soundware pack: £1-2. Many Thanks. 





Disclaimer:

The information contained within this blog post is offered on an informal basis and is correct to the best of my knowledge. I accept no responsibility for outcomes arising from the mis/interpretation or use of this information and/or associated download files. Always download files via security/scanning software. All errors and omissions are excepted. 

Sunday, October 10, 2021

VST Synth News: Martinic AX73 Virtual Analog Synthesizer.

 



One surprise that came down the pipe in the last week was a new Akai AX73 virtual analog synth recreation. 

Which is kind of fitting really, because I seem to remember the AX73 itself was a bit of a surprise when it was launched all those years ago, being, as it was. one of Akai first forays into the world of professional electronic musical instruments. 

Like most modern software re-imaginings, Martinic's AX73 offers some additional functionality and features including a comprehensive digital effects section with phaser, flanging, delay, reverb and distortion, a second VCO plus sub oscillator from the AX80, and expanded modulation possibilities with up 8 envelope generators and 8 LFOs. 

It also offers dual split or layer/stack modes and each layer has it's own independent 11 mode arpeggiator. 

Plenty of presets have been provided with over 600, programmed by Nori Ubukata, Summa, and someone known only as 'Synth Guru Wiffen', which I imagine is my old friend Paul Wiffen. 

The AX73 looks like a really worthwhile addition to the raft of analog synth recreations that are available. I'll take a closer look shortly and post a review in the coming days. In the meantime you can get more information and download a demo version of the synth over at Martinic's website. 





And you can follow me at my Facebook Page for all the latest computer music software and hardware news, reviews as well as tons of free soundware including sample libraries, synth patches, loops and beats. 

Martinic AX73 is available from PluginFox




 

Disclaimer:

The information contained within this blog post is offered on an informal basis and is correct to the best of my knowledge. I accept no responsibility for outcomes arising from the mis/interpretation or use of this information and/or associated download files. Always download files via security/scanning software. All errors and omissions are excepted. 

Saturday, October 9, 2021

VST SYNTH REVIEW: Full Bucket Music FB7999. Korg DW8000 / DW6000 Digital/Analog Synthesizer Emulation.

 


One of the things I immediately look for when trying out a new software synth is how easy and how much fun it is to program. Can I start making great, original sounds within minutes or even seconds. The answer with Full Bucket's FB7999 is a resounding yes, 

FB7999 is a Korg DW6000/8000 digital/analog hybrid synthesizer emulation. 

In the timeline of major Korg synths, the DWs came in the wake of the Poly 61/M, and before the all-conquering M1. Like the Poly 61, they share the same kind of 'digital access' parameter control where one 'value' slider can be assigned to, and control all of the synths parameters. So although the DW6000 was, after the DWGS (digital waveform generators), a truly analog synthesizer, it doesn't have the plethora of knobs and sliders commonly associated with analog synthesizers. This obviously helped to make the instruments more affordable, but also assisted in the programming and patch storage/recall capabilities of the instrument.  

So while the DWs produced interesting and powerful sounds, they came into the affordable price bracket. 

So what you have with the FB7999 is a fairly 'standard' analog filter and amp setup each with their own 6 stage envelope generator and a single LFO able to modulate pitch or filter frequency.

The oscillators are Korg DWGS types, and are a kind of early version of a wavetable with a number of different sampled 'abstract' type waveforms as well as standard sawtooth and sine waves, although waveform two is close to a square wave. The rest of the waveforms can only really be identified as 'organ-like' or 'bell-like', etc. 

There are two oscillators, each with the same set of available waveforms, and the second can be detuned or an interval set. 

The DW8000 had a velocity and aftertouch sensitive keyboard and so velocity modulation could be applied to both the filter as well as the amplifier section, whilst aftertouch could be applied to both these parameters as well as LFO modulation of the oscillator for 'vibrato' effects. Korg refer to their LFOs as MGs, or modulation generators. These parameters are disabled when you enter 'DW6000 Mode' via a switch in the top section of controls. 

Portamento, or keyboard glide is available and this seems to work in conjunction with the 'auto-bend' parameters.

Four keyboard modes are available with two 'unison' or mono stack modes for fat bass and lead sounds, and two polyphonic modes. Unison 2 offers a 'legato' mode without filter retriggering.

This software emulation of the DW Series also offer a maximum 64 voice polyphony over the hardware equivalent version's 16 voices.  

Patch loading and saving is a breeze from the main menu and uses the .fxb file extension. 

As I mentioned at the top, I found FB7999 to be instantly accessible and fun to program with an excellent library of factory sounds to get started with, and I found myself creating both 'classic' and more interesting synth patches. I found myself storing patches one after another. Once I've got a few more I'll share these and make them available to download. 

I recently reviewed Full Bucket's WhispAir synth and whilst I like the technical achievement of the product, I did find it slightly heavier going when it came to quickly creating patches. I played around with it for some time, and really didn;t manage to come up with much that I liked. I'm sure that measuring the quality of synthsizer patches is a subjective issue, I feel I found no such trouble with the DW7999. It's instant and accessible from the moment the GUI arrives on your screen. 

Hope you enjoyed this review and found it useful. Look out for other reviews and the fisrst set of FB7999 synth patches by following my Facebook Page. You'll also find lots of other free soundware, sample libraries, synth patches, loops, and beats. 

More information and download link at the Full Bucket Music website. 




Disclaimer:

The information contained within this blog post is offered on an informal basis and is correct to the best of my knowledge. I accept no responsibility for outcomes arising from the mis/interpretation or use of this information and/or associated download files. Always download files via security/scanning software. 



Friday, October 8, 2021

VST INSTRUMENT NEWS: A Look At Decent Sampler.

 



I recently came across the concept of decent sampler

It's an idea that's been developed by David Hilowitz. The concept consists of a free 'player' which is a VST/AAX instrument for Windows, Mac or Linux. 

Sampled instruments can then be loaded from the decent samples website or, I guess, from other third party soundware developers should they wish to support the platform/format whatever you'd like to call it. 

Sampled instruments are developed through a bunch of attributes (samples) alongside an XML file which can be edited via a text editor which basically instructs the decent sampler player where to place (map) the samples, sort velocity layers, add effects, assign root notes to samples, etc. 

To me the concept seems rather similar to developing a soundfont. Although there are a number of visual soundfont editors around which make this process easier, such as Polyphone, soundfonts can also be constructed in a similar way via a simple text editor.

However, soundfonts can only be loaded into a number of compatible instruments using the UI (user interface) of whichever instrument you choose. Bitwig's Sampler and Reason's NN-XT can both load .SF2 soundfonts whilst Zampler can load .sfz files with it's associated samples.  

What caught my eye about the decent sampler process is that you can define a background image and a basic 'user interface' with your own user defined controls and parameters. So you're more into 'virtual instrument' territory where you're defining the look and the controls and parameters of the instrument rather than just loading into a compatible device. 

At the moment, the parameters and 'knobs' that are available are a little limited, but David has already developed additional effects including chorus and phasing to the reverb that was also available. There is also a low pass filter parameter for setting up a 'tone' control within the user interface. So the concept is developing. Since it is, perhaps, primarily for acoustic instrument recreations, synth style parameters such as LFOs may be considered beyond it's scope. 

The one thing I guess I am curious about is whether there is a basic 4 stage amp envelope parameter set available. I would have thought it would be rather difficult to develop realistic sampled based acoustic instruments without such control. I will investigate further....

In the meantime, if the decent sampler (DS) concept interests you, you can find more information via the link below.




David has also produced a handy video showing you how you can develop DS instruments via a bunch of samples plus a text editor. You can check this out below. 






I don't think, at this point, I'll start to try developing instruments in this format. There still seems to be one or two gaps in the concept for my liking and I would like a dedicated editor rather than a text editor (David does hint at the possibility in the video maybe), but I will follow and see how the development goes.   


Disclaimer:

The information contained within this blog post is offered on an informal basis and is correct to the best of my knowledge. I accept no responsibility for outcomes arising from the mis/interpretation or use of this information and/or associated download files. Always download files via security/scanning software. 

Thursday, October 7, 2021

HARDWARE NEWS: UA Announce New Volt Series Audio Interfaces.

 




Universal Audio have launched a new range of affordable USB 2.0 Audio and Midi interfaces designed for anything from basic podcasting/speech applications through to pro music. 

All of them have vintage microphone tube emulation for a rich, warm sound, built in MIDI capability and a suite of entry level software versions to get you started including Ableton Live Lite, Melodyne, and Marshall and Ampeg amps sims for the guitarists and bass players. 

There are five models in the range. Three of them are desktop format interfaces with on board '76' analog compressor(s) which are based on UA's iconic 1176 compressor. These are available in single, 2, and 4 channel versions known as the 176, 276, and 476 respectively. 

The other two products in the range are mini-rack format types with front mounted controls. These are the Volt 1, and Volt 2 interfaces and are single and 2 channel models respectively. 

No prices as yet, but I'm sure these will fit the bill for many artists and songwriters looking for quality interfaces that don't break the bank. 

The entry level version of Ableton wouldn't be my choice for songwriters, but you could soon download your free copy of Soundbridge alongside my instrument and soundware pack for a much more songwriter-friendly entry level music production platform. In my view. 

More information on Soundbridge and my 'ultimate' entry level music production platform can be found via the link below. 





More information on Universal Audio's new Volt interfaces via UA's website below. 





Follow/Like my Facebook Page to stay up to date with all the latest hardware developments as well as the latest DAW, software instrument, and soundware developments. 


Disclaimer:

The information contained within this blog post is offered on an informal basis and is correct to the best of my knowledge. I accept no responsibility for outcomes arising from the mis/interpretation or use of this information and/or associated download files. Always download files via security/scanning software. 





Wednesday, October 6, 2021

FREE VST SYNTH NEWS: Full Bucket FB7999 VST Synthesizer.



 

I have vague recollections of the odd DW6000/8000 coming through one of the retail emporiums I used to work in either as a second hand or part exchanged item. 

I seem to remember rather linking them. Something a bit warmer than the Yamaha FM synths of the time, easier to program, and a bit more instantly gratifying. I only really started to like FM synths once they'd developed and bit and started offering stack modes and such. TX81Z/DX11 generation. That kind of thing. Seem to remember DW Series was a little bit before then. 

Never sold them new. Never really sold any Korg products from new. During my time selling keyboards and synths in the West End, the Korg distributor had their own shop there and were happily retailing items whilst also wholesaling them to dealers. We never involved ourselves in such unethical practices, so no Korg products form me during my time on Denmark Street. 

Interestingly, it's a practice that continues to this day. I don't understand why any keyboard/music shop would spend time, money, and effort grinding out Yamaha products whilst they are happily competing with you via their own swanky, no expense spared retail emporium in the heart of London. But hey..... music retail has never been a bastion of high-ethics. 

Anyway. Before I say something really controversial and end up getting sued, back to the FB7999......

So before Korg conquered the world with the M1, and also before they barely made a ripple with the FM derived 707, and in the wake of the Poly 61, there were the two DWs. 

FB Music seem to specialize in Korg emulations, although there are some 'original' style instruments such as the WhispAir wavetable synth that I checked out a couple of months ago. You'll find this via the link below. 





As it's name suggests, and since it has the 16 digital waveforms of the DW8000, and will respond to velocity information , it is fair to say that the FB7999 can be thought of as a DW8000 emulator. Although I don't think it has the arpeggiator. 

DW Series generated a number of waveforms via two digital oscillators known as DWGS (digital waveform generators). After that, a pretty standard subtractive mode of synthesis is employed with filters and pitch/filter/amp envelope generators. Although digitally controlled, the DW Series are equipped with genuine analog filter and amp sections. 

The two polyphonic and the two unison modes of the original DW have been retained, only now you have 64 voices of polyphony to play with instead of 16. 

The digital delay of the DW Series has also been implemented. The very short delay times can be used to create chorus and phasing effects. 

Anyway. That's about all I can tell you at this point. I've downloaded my copy and will check it out shortly and deliver my verdict/opinion, although I don't have any real DWs lying around so it won't be really possible to assess it's authenticity compared to the real hardware versions. But we'll take a look shortly.

In the meantime, you can find more information and download your own copy via the Full Bucket Music website below. 




Disclaimer:

The information contained within this blog post is offered on an informal basis and is correct to the best of my knowledge. I accept no responsibility for outcomes arising from the mis/interpretation or use of this information and/or associated download files. Always download files via security/scanning software. 

Tuesday, October 5, 2021

VST PRODUCT NEWS: Computer Music Magazine. U-he Zebra CM Gets a Makeover.

 



When I re-ignited my interest in music production, and specifically computer music a few years ago, I'm happy to say that Computer Music Magazine was a large source of information and resources. 

With every edition of the magazine, readers gain access to a comprehensive suite of free instrument and effects plug-ins. 

I still regularly use the Computer Music version of Synapse Audio's DUNE CM despite it being a few years old. In fact I use it much more than my copy of DUNE 3 which I purchased on a special offer last year. I really got to know DUNE via the CM version and I've programmed loads of sounds for it and really got to know it inside out. I consider myself a DUNE CM power user!

Since then, I've also added Dimitry Sches THORN CM to my 'roster' of regularly used plug-in synths. I use that one a lot as well. 

So for the princely sum of £6/7 you get a really powerful selection of synthesizer plug-ins. 

Computer Music U-he Zebra CM and Bazille CM. 


In addition to the Synapse Audio and Dimitry Sches products, U-he also supply two synthesizer products to the Computer Music 'roster', Zebra CM and Bazille CM. Both of these products have received an update and makeover which will be available in the coming issues of the magazine. 

Zebra CM's GUI has had a complete cosmetic makeover of it's GUI and now looks completely different. I think it's a big improvement on the original looks which I always thought a little strange and slightly off-putting if I'm honest. 

But there are a few other important differences. These include support for new Apple M1 ARM chips as well as Big Sur compatibility, VST3 support, and a 'sorted and polished' preset library browser. I'll let you know what that means when I get hold of a copy. 

You can find the full list of updates at the link below. 




In addition to the Zebra CM updates, there's also an updated version of Bazille CM. This is a semi-modular phase manipulation style synthesizer offering phase modulation and phase distortion synthesizer techniques. I must admit, I haven't got too far beyond the factory presets on this one, but it does sound impressive. 

Once again, we have Apple compatibility updates with support for Big Sur and ARM M1 chips, as well as VST3 support but no cosmetic GUI updates. Improved GUI performances and a number of bug fixes are mentioned. 

Once again, you can get the full list of updates via the U-he website via the link below. 




I suppose, in conclusion, I'd just like to say that this level of commitment to two magware products that were released several years ago, I find rather admirable. Making sure they're up to date and compatible with as many reader's machines and setups as possible. Excellent. Well done!

Once they're available via Computer Music, I'll provide updated information, particularly on the updated Zebra CM




Disclaimer:

The information contained within this blog post is offered on an informal basis and is correct to the best of my knowledge. I accept no responsibility for outcomes arising from the mis/interpretation or use of this information and/or associated download files. Always download files via security/scanning software. 





Monday, October 4, 2021

BLOG UPDATE: Coming up. STM OCTOBER 2021. Free Soundware, DAW Review, New Products.

 


October 2021 at STM. 

So what are the plans for October I hear you ask.

Well, this month I'll be taking a closer look at Tracktion's Waveform music production platform. There is a freeware version available and I'll be taking a look at that. It's one of the few entry level/freeware packages I haven't reviewed so we'll take a look and see what it's about. It's probably the most cross-platform of music packages and will run on Mac/Windows and Linux which means theoretically you can run it as a piece of music software for Rasberry Pi computer.



 

As far as soundware goes, there'll be the 'Temple Sitar' soundware pack which will be available as an SF2 Soundfont, Zampler patches, Reason NN-XT, and also as a Bitwig Instrument. It's a new and exclusive soundfont developed from scratch and, so far, it's sounding great. Sitars are used across all musical genres from classical music through to rock, indie, and pop, so this one's going to be a good 'un!






I haven't really been able to find a piano soundfont that has really come up to scratch so I'm going to set about creating one. I've got some excellent piano samples, so I'll see what I can come up with. I'm calling it the 'Ultimate Piano' soundfont, but we'll see what transpires!







It's also going to be 'Synthpad Month' for my dedicated soundfont page, so there'll be four more great new synthpad type soundfonts. All developed and sampled 'from scratch' and expertly looped. With lots of accompanying patches for Zampler






On the synth patch front, there'll be the first set of free sounds for Cherry Audio's Mercury 4 Jupiter 4 emulation. It comes with loads of great patches, but I'm sure I can come up with some new and different kind of things. 





  

On the drums front, E-Drum Mechanics Volume Five is coming together with several hundred original electronic drum samples, which should now take the whole E-Drum Mechanics library up to well above a thousand samples. As usual, there'll be big/fat resamples, and 'ready to play' kits for Ritmix






As far as hardware synths are concerned, there'll be a new volume of 'Pads and Soundscapes' for Roland FA Series, and Korg Kross 2 'Urban Vol 1' will be completed with 64 synth patches, 64 drum hits, and 64 sampled drum loops based around 'urban' music styles such as rap and hip-hop. If you can still say that!

....and finally, there'll be a new Ghost Machine vintage drum machine sample/resample/kit collection. Only problem is, I'm not sure which machine it will be yet. I've recently done a classic Yamaha and Roland machine, so maybe it's time for something from an alternative manufacturer. I'll keep you posted, when I decide. 

Plus lots of new product and updates new as and when it happens, so stay tuned, follow me at my Facebook Page for all the updates as they happen, and as the soundware products become available. Hope to see you there.......

Sunday, October 3, 2021

SOUNDWARE: Synth Pads Soundfont (.sf2) and Zampler Patches.

 


Synth Pad .sf2 Soundfont and Eight Zampler Patches. 

'Ethereal' soundtrack style synth pad.
 
New and exclusive synthesizer soundfont. Developed from scratch, this soundfont has been expertly sampled and looped, to produce a synth pad with plenty of motion and power. Great for ambient and soundtrack composers. 

Great thing about synth samples is that once you get them into an instrument like Zampler you can do so much with them. Zampler's filtering, modulation and effects sections allow you to play with these samples as if they were waveform from a synthesizer oscillator. So I've come up with eight Zampler patches using these basic samples, and you could probably come up with a whole lot more. 

Many software instruments are still capable of loading .SF2 soundfonts including Reason's NN-XT sample instrument and Bitwig's Sampler instrument. 

Synth Pad Soundfont Download Links. 

The .SF2 soundfont can be downloaded from the following link. Different instruments have different methods for loading soundfonts. Some let you 'drag' the file into the instrument, some use a 'browser' method or 'load' button. 

You can download the .SF2 soundfont from the link below. 




For the Zampler patches you will need to download the entire following folder. Zampler uses a .sfz soundfont which doesn't embed the samples. So you need the samples, the .sfz soundfont and the .fxb patches. Simply download the whole folder to your hard drive then use Zampler 'load patch' function to navigate to the .fxb patch files. Then select th epatch you want to load and play. Zampler will locate everything else it needs from the 'nested' folder. 

The collection for Zampler is called Ethereal Soundtracks, and you can download the folder from the link below. 




Optional Donation. 

If you like the products and use them, would like to support future projects, or buy me a drink,  then please donate via my Paypal.me page via the image/link below. Suggested donation for this soundware pack: £1-2. Many Thanks. 





Disclaimer:

The information contained within this blog post is offered on an informal basis and is correct to the best of my knowledge. I accept no responsibility for outcomes arising from the mis/interpretation or use of this information and/or associated download files. Always download files via security/scanning software.